Existing tools


A range of existing tools and guides, which primarily focus on chemicals and textiles

 

ALL ABOUT CHEMICALS AND TEXTILES

AFIRM's restricted substances list
“The AFIRM RSL is a tool for suppliers to establish chemical management knowledge and processes, build base compliance with AFIRM member chemical restrictions, and provide a common base for analytical testing.”. “AFIRM Group brands agree on the chemicals included in the AFIRM RSL, the allowable limits, and the test methods.”. “Suppliers at all levels of the apparel and footwear supply chain are encouraged to use the AFIRM RSL as a reference for limits and testing methods of restricted substances possibly found in apparel and footwear raw materials and production processes.”. Includes a “risk matrix”, highlighting the restricted substance risks associated with different fibres and materials.

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>> DOWNLOAD PDF FILE
AAFA's restricted substances list
“This Restricted Substance List (RSL) is intended to provide apparel and footwear companies with information related to regulations and laws that restrict or ban certain chemicals and substances in finished home textile, apparel, and footwear products around the world.

The RSL was developed by a special working group of the American Apparel & Footwear Association’s (AAFA’s) Environmental Task Force. It serves as a practical tool to help individuals in textile, apparel and footwear companies, and their suppliers - responsible for environmental compliance throughout the supply chain - to become more aware of various national and international regulations governing the amount of substances that are permitted in finished home textile, apparel, and footwear products.

The RSL will be updated on a regular basis and will be supplemented with additional resources to help officials in these companies undertake responsible chemical management practices in the aforementioned finished products.”

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ZDHC's manufacturing restricted substances list and conformity guidance
“The ZDHC MRSL V1.1 is a list of chemical substances banned from intentional use in facilities that process textile materials and trim parts in apparel and footwear. The MRSL establishes acceptable concentration limits for substances in chemical formulations used within manufacturing facilities. The limits are designed to eliminate the possibility of intentional use of listed substances. The intent of the MRSL is to manage the input of chemicals to the suppliers and remove those hazardous substances from the manufacturing process. It is a living document and will be updated as needed to expand the materials and processes covered and to add substances that should be phased out of the value-chain.

On an ongoing basis, we will publish the results of studies undertaken as part of this initiative. Documents listed below will be updated as soon as new information becomes available.”

There are “Chemical Guidance Sheets” for 11 specific chemicals (please refer to the web-site for details) including Nonylphenol Ethoxylates (NPEOs), Nonylphenol (NP), Phthalates, Chlorobenzenes, Chlorophenols, Halogenated Solvents, Organotins, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHS) / Naphthalene, Toluene, Long-chain Perfluoroalkyl Acids (LCPFAAs) and Short-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins.

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>> DOWNLOAD PDF FILE
ChemSec's chemical management guide for textiles
“This is ChemSec’s Chemical Management Guide for textiles. Chemical management is a three-step process. Find chemicals, evaluate them and act to replace the hazardous ones”. “We are ChemSec, a non-profit organisation working for a world free of hazardous chemicals”

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AFIRM's supplier toolkit
In 2004, a group of companies began working to bring together several product chemistry, safety, and regulatory experts within the apparel and footwear industry. AFIRM has developed a toolkit for the work with chemical restrictions. The toolkit covers the entire supply chain including dye-houses, print-houses and suppliers of accessories. Includes simple overviews for specific materials and action-flow diagrams. For illustration, e.g.:
– Page 2 highlights “risks” for specific chemicals for specific fibres and materials;
– Page 3 gives an “action-flow” understanding of “chemical risks”.

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>> DOWNLOAD PDF FILE
AFIRM's chemical guidance document
AFIRM has published a chemistry encyclopaedia for textiles. For chemical experts, only. Written by Dieter Sedlak.

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MORE ABOUT CHEMICALS AND TEXTILES (NORWAY & DENMARK)

A guide to safe textiles – chemical compounds in textiles
This guide operates with these 3 levels:
– Level 1: Handling of chemicals that are forbidden incl. restrictions on the use
– Level 2: Handling of problematic chemicals
– Level 3: Handling of chemicals using stricter requirements e.g. through labelling and certification schemes.

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Danish Environmental Protection Agency - Textiles
DEPA web-site presenting (in Danish): “On this web-site you can get an overview about chemicals regulated in textiles and links to relevant knowledge”.

>> GO TO WEBSITE
VIRKE's restricted substances list
Restricted substances list (RSL) and guide focused on textiles.

>> GO TO RSL
>> GO TO GUIDE
Danish Fashion & Textile's guide to chemicals and legislation
Guidelines for management of chemicals in textiles and information about legislation. Find answers to questions such as these: Which chemicals are allowed in textiles? Which chemical substances are particularly problematic? What is stated by REACH?

>> GO TO WEBSITE
(Access requires membership of Danish Fashion & Textile)

 

CHEMICAL SUBSTITUTION AND CROSS-SECTORS ABOUT CHEMICALS

OECD Substitution and Alternatives Assessment Toolbox
"Welcome to the OECD Substitution and Alternatives Assessment Toolbox (SAAT) — a compilation of resources relevant to chemical substitution and alternatives assessments. Visit the four resource areas below to learn more about chemical substitution and alternatives assessments and get practical guidance on conducting them."

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SUBSPORT - Moving towards safer alternatives
“SUBSPORT is a free-of-charge, multilingual platform for information exchange on alternative substances and technologies, as well as tools and guidance for substance evaluation and substitution management.

The SUBSPORT web portal aims to be the first entry point for anyone interested in substituting hazardous chemicals, to support companies in fulfilling substitution requirements within EU legislation, as well as being a resource for other stakeholders such as authorities, environmental and consumer organisations, and scientific institutions.”

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ChemSec's SIN list
“Our most well-known tool is the SIN List (it’s actually more known than ChemSec itself). It’s a searchable database with chemicals that fulfil the REACH criteria of being Substances of Very High Concern, so called SVHCs. The SIN List has been around for almost 10 years now and policy makers, companies and chemical producers recognize it as an important driver of chemical innovation. Over 10 000 professionals use it in different ways every year.

For example, small and large businesses alike use it to screen their products for SVHCs to know which chemicals to prioritize for substitution – before they are regulated. Hospitals use it as a restriction list for procurement. Others use it to communicate unwanted substances in the supply chain”

“We are ChemSec, a non-profit organisation working for a world free of hazardous chemicals”

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ECHA's candidate list of substances of very high concern for authorisation
“Authentic version: Only the Candidate List published on this website is deemed authentic. Companies may have immediate legal obligations following the inclusion of a substance in the Candidate List on this website including in particular Articles 7, 31 and 33 of the REACH Regulation.”. On 2017-11-23 there are 174 substances of very high concern (SVHC’s).

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Business guidance on phtalates – how to limit phthalates of concern in articles?
“This guidance should help you as a buyer to check whether you buy articles with the phthalates of concern, and it examines the requirements you must meet if you market these articles. In addition, the guidance aims to give advice to voluntary effort by helping you to get started with the process of assessing whether the phthalates of concern can be avoided. The guidance provides instructions on what you can do and how the necessary dialogue with your supplier can be approached. Also, specific examples of the various steps in the process are provided.”

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HOLISTIC APPROACHES TO ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES AND RECALL IN THE EU

DIEH's good environmental practices
A practical handbook for suppliers and sub-suppliers. The handbook was developed to support companies environmental work – including chemicals. There are case-examples from the fashion and textile sector, operating with 3 levels, described as a process and journey. The 3 levels are:
– Beginner
– Improver
– Achiever.
The latter level also includes “best practise”, however environmental work is new to the “Beginner”.

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The Higg materials sustainability index
“The Higg MSI provides access to a large amount of relevant information about the impacts of material production used in the apparel, footwear, and home textile industries. You can leverage the information in different ways to get a clear understanding of what is causing different types of material impacts, and different production processes that can be used to reduce those impacts.”

>> GO TO SAC MSI
>> GO TO HIGG MSI
MADE BY's guide to textile wet processing standards
"Our Guide to Textile Wet Processing Standards provides an objective and comparative overview of many of the industry certifications related to wet processing.

The tool helps you to navigate the numerous standards and supporting you to select ones that best fit your individual goals, whether that might be energy reduction, hazardous chemical reduction, support in environmental management, labelling of sustainable products, or a combination covering several areas.

We developed this guide in collaboration with the managing bodies themselves and update the tool on a regular basis.”

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OR GO DIRECTLY TO THESE SPECIFIC STANDARDS:
>> BLUE ANGEL
>> BLUESIGN STANDARD
>> CRADLE TO CRADLE CERTIFIED™
>> EU ECOLABEL FOR TEXTILES
>> GOTS
>> GRS
>> ISO 14001:2004
>> NATURTEXTIL iVN CERTIFIED BEST
>> NORDIC SWAN
>> OEKO-TEX® STANDARD 100
>> STeP BY OEKO-TEX®
EU's rapid alert system
“The Rapid Alert System for non-food dangerous products facilitates the rapid exchange of information between national authorities of 31 countries and the European Commission on dangerous products found on the market.” The system sends out weekly reports.

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Looking for a simpler tool?


Safer Textiles also presents a basic step-by-step tool to help you ensure your clothes production observe EU regulations.

 
DISCLAIMER
The information presented on SaferTextiles.eu is educational and intended for informational purposes only. It does not constitute legal advice and is not a substitute for legal advice or product testing. There is no warranty, expressed or implied, as to the completeness or utility of the information contained on this website, including, without limitation, that the information is current and error-free. Compliance House disclaims liability of any kind whatsoever resulting from any use of or reliance on SaferTextiles.eu.

If you encounter any errors when using the site, please inform us on webmaster [at] safertextiles.eu. Questions and queries will not be answered.